Ahh pierógi, the dumplings of the Polish! The pierógi or pieróg in the unlikely case that you’re only having one, is an unleavened dough that is stuffed, boiled and then baked or sautéed in butter and garlic. These little pillows of heaven are scrumptious, filling and can be made fresh and then frozen for a future quick meal.

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Pierogies!

Our perogies were stuffed with potatoes and cheese much like the Ukrainian version Varenyky. In true Polish fashion they can be enjoyed with a Kielbasa Weijska, a u-shaped countryside sausage made from pork, veal, marjoram and garlic. I’ve had the delight of growing up with these because my family lives in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan where most locals immigrated from Northern Europe. When we go home to visit next, I will be getting a recipe from a tried and trusted source. In the meantime, I have to find the closest thing my butcher has to offer. Look for a spicy sausage if you can’t find kielbasa.
Perogies can be purchased from the store, I think we’ve used Buitoni brand but if you’re feeling adventurous you can make them from scratch which is always a tastier choice.
Sadly my Polish family left me no special secret family recipe so below is a link to a good enough recipe (I can’t write it out on this page because it’s not my property). I will be practicing this recipe and making some needed changes. The cottage cheese doesn’t lend much flavor so that will be the first ingredient I replace.
http://www.food.com/recipe/homemade-potato-and-cheese-pierogies-old-fashioned-perogies-66652

Chop the sausage into forkable bite sizes and sauté until warm. If your sausage is freshly made and raw, not smoked, follow the cooking temperature guidelines of whichever meat is in your sausage. Boil the pierogi and then in the sautéed pan that cooked the Kielbasa sweat a clove of garlic. Add the pierogi to the sauté pan and sear it.

The sauce-
I am a cheese snob and I admit that openly. The process of making cheese disgusts me so it has to be amazing for it to be worth eating. One of my favorites is Uniekaas Robusto which I buy at whole foods. It is a nutty hybrid of aged Gouda and Parmesa with a delicious crunch of tyrosine crystals and in the same family as Parrano. This sharp creamy cheese melts perfectly and provides a complimentary flavor component for our polish dinner! We just won’t tell anyone that Robusto is from Holland.
•Finely Grate or microplane 1/2 cup of Robusto Cheese.
•Bring 1 cup of heavy cream to a simmer stirring occasionally to avoid burning the milk solids.
•Whisk in the Robusto a little at a time until fully incorporated. If you add cheese to quickly it coagulates and becomes stringy.
•Once all of the cheese is added let it lightly simmer while whisking to evaporate out some water. This will thicken the sauce to your desired thickness. I prefer a nappe sauce where the it coats the back of a spoon.
•Season the sauce with kosher salt and fresh ground nutmeg.

The following three images are from google, I take no credit for them.

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Fresh nutmeg
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Hillshire Farm Kielbasa
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Whole Foods’ Robusto Cheese

We hope you enjoy this recipe!

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11 thoughts on “Pierogie and Kielbasa Sausage with Robusto Sauce”

  1. Most of my family is from Poland. I am especially fond of this post. My grandparents migrated from Poland to Wheeling, WV. Every time we went to visit we ate the traditional golumpki (polish cabbage rolls), pierogies, and chicken noodle soup. Their favorite dish, however puzzling though, was Kentucky Fried Chicken. There were lots of Polish migrants who moved to that area and to this day they still offer a Polish Mass on Tuesday nights.
  2. Most of my family is from Poland. I am especially fond of this post. My grandparents migrated from Poland to Wheeling, WV. Every time we went to visit we ate the traditional golumpki (polish cabbage rolls), pierogies, and chicken noodle soup. Their favorite dish, however puzzling though, was Kentucky Fried Chicken. There were lots of Polish migrants who moved to that area and to this day they still offer a Polish Mass on Tuesday nights.
  3. Most of my family is from Poland. I am especially fond of this post. My grandparents migrated from Poland to Wheeling, WV. Every time we went to visit we ate the traditional golumpki (polish cabbage rolls), pierogies, and chicken noodle soup. Their favorite dish, however puzzling though, was Kentucky Fried Chicken. There were lots of Polish migrants who moved to that area and to this day they still offer a Polish Mass on Tuesday nights.

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